10 lessons in how to build your professional network…

A Twitter thread by

@davidspinks

🤝

1. Build community. There’s no better way to improve your reputation in a field than to be the one bringing people together.

Offline is key: Host events. Big or small. Conferences, meetups or dinners all work.

2. Do great work. If people recognize the work you do before they meet you, they’ll respect you a lot more.

The best connections you’ll make are with the people you work with directly. Choose them wisely.

3. Support people at the same stage as you.

I used to wonder how all these successful people knew each other and would ALWAYS promote each other. It’s because they came up together. My most valuable connections are ppl I became friends with 5-10 years ago before they “made it”.

4. Close the loop when people help you.

If you get advice, follow up later to thank the person, and let them know how it went.

If you get introduced to someone, or make an introduction to someone, follow up and thank them after the meeting.

5. Help every chance you get. The ability to help others is a privilege. Constantly build good karma but giving, with no expectation of returns.

6. Participate in intimate events. Choose the smaller coworking space. Attend the smaller dinners. Join the smaller online communities. Smaller groups will give you a chance to develop deeper relationships.

7. Write consistently. Share what you’re learning along the way. Tweet, blog, video, whatever your format, just keep sharing. Writing a book is the ultimate reputation booster.

You’re never too young to write a book (see: https://t.co/7Og05aeHAA by @erickoester)

8. When you go to networking events, try to talk to less people, for more time. One or two deep conversations are exponentially more valuable than ten quick conversations.

9. If your industry has a big hub in a city, live there for some time. This isn’t going to be possible or easy for everyone, and it’s becoming less important, but it’s still extremely valuable.

The serendipity of running into people in SF has been huge for me.

10. Be transparent in your work, writing, and conversations.

Transparency makes people feel like they know you better, like they can trust you, even if they’re just following you online. It brings them into your journey.

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